European House Sparrow bird gallery, British ornithology artwork - Katey Jane Photography

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    UK Free Delivery but please contact for postage prices and details for EU and beyond.

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    All deliveries are insured, paper only prints posted in tubes or flat packed if  available.

    All photographs are printed to order and can take around 7 days, Please note I run my whole business myself.

    Alternatively if you find a print you like, copy and paste the URL of the image and use the contact form or email janeandrews805@yahoo.com or call me on 07951635142 if you wish to go over the print in detail.

    Photographs printed on high quality Canon luster or standard glossy paper, using Canons high quality photographic inks.


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    With a range of sizes with commercial and personal use licenses, these are available through the BUY buttons only (not my add to cart buttons under the photos) for website use and more.


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    Two sizes or frames available, A3 plus size 25.5 x 19 & A4  16 X 10 all full size edge to edge of the outside frames with safety or standard glass read to hang for large frames and A4 can be wall mount or stand, with photograph details, place or subject on the back. these are stock bought so are mostly MDF black or white frames.

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    All frames are sealed with gummed tape.


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    Card mounts normally black but other colours available on request, they use the same colour backing board, are Bevel Cut with a single aperture high quality Daler Rowney or similar Mountboard acid free, with details of the photograph, place or subject(s).


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    Care of Photograph: To be treated as a photograph.

    Do not hang or place in intense sunlight and keep dry.

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    Old photo restoration

    Got any old photos that needs restoring? I restore damaged, faded and turn slides and negaitives into normal photos, want more info please View My Photo Restoration Page HERE please use your browser back button to return to this page

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house sparrows

  • Description (click)

    The house sparrow can be confused with a number of other seed-eating birds, especially its relatives in the genus Passer. Many of these relatives are smaller, with an appearance that is neater or "cuter", as with the Dead Sea sparrow. The dull-coloured female can often not be distinguished from other females, and is nearly identical to those of the Spanish and Italian sparrows. The Eurasian tree sparrow is smaller and more slender with a chestnut crown and a black patch on each cheek. The male Spanish sparrow and Italian sparrow are distinguished by their chestnut crowns. The Sind sparrow is very similar but smaller, with less black on the male's throat and a distinct pale supercilium on the female.

    House sparrows can breed in the breeding season immediately following their hatching, and sometimes attempt to do so. Some birds breeding for the first time in tropical areas are only a few months old and still have juvenile plumage. Birds breeding for the first time are rarely successful in raising young, and reproductive success increases with age, as older birds breed earlier in the breeding season, and fledge more young. As the breeding season approaches, hormone releases trigger enormous increases in the size of the sexual organs and changes in day length lead males to start calling by nesting sites. The timing of mating and egg-laying varies geographically, and between specific locations and years because a sufficient supply of insects is needed for egg formation and feeding nestlings. Males take up nesting sites before the breeding season, by frequently calling beside them. Unmated males start nest construction and call particularly frequently to attract females. When a female approaches a male during this period, the male displays by moving up and down while drooping and shivering his wings, pushing up his head, raising and spreading his tail, and showing his bib. Males may try to mate with females while calling or displaying. In response, a female will adopt a threatening posture and attack a male before flying away, pursued by the male. The male displays in front of her, attracting other males, which also pursue and display to the female. This group display usually does not immediately result in copulations. Other males usually do not copulate with the female. Copulation is typically initiated by the female giving a soft dee-dee-dee call to the male. Birds of a pair copulate frequently until the female is laying eggs, and the male mounts the female repeatedly each time a pair mates. The house sparrow is monogamous, and typically mates for life. Birds from pairs often engage in extra-pair copulations, so about 15% of house sparrow fledglings are unrelated to their mother's mate. Male house sparrows guard their mates carefully to avoid being cuckolded, and most extra-pair copulation occurs away from nest sites. Males may sometimes have multiple mates, and bigamy is mostly limited by aggression between females. Many birds do not find a nest and a mate, and instead may serve as helpers around the nest for mated pairs, a role which increases the chances of being chosen to replace a lost mate. Lost mates of both sexes can be replaced quickly during the breeding season. The formation of a pair and the bond between the two birds is tied to the holding of a nest site, though paired house sparrows can recognise each other away from the nest.

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