English church architecture glossary with pictures - Katey Jane Photography

Glossary of British Architecture


Ever wondered what all those carvings were called at the church you just visited? Well, I'm often left wondering why its there and what on earth was it called.

I often see many websites that have useful info but will have no picture reference, So my friend and I from Japan have decided to make a text and image-based glossary, with my photography skills and his keen interest in architecture, a quick and straightforward way to learn about different architectural terms.

We both have a keen amateur interest in architecture and its history, so for us, it is a learning curve all the time and a challenge for me as a photographer to spot as much as possible in and around old buildings and of course having fun along the way. Page created on 13/7/2019



New listings will be added often and in alphabetical order.



Bell-cot-Bellcotes are most common in church architecture

Bellcote

A stone or brick bell cover or frame, often at th east of the nave, commonly holding just one bell but can be upto three bells. Bellcotes or bell cote of spelt diffirently. Bellcotes are often seen around the Cambridgeshire Fens where many churches have no bell towers or spires.

Photo: St Peter and St Paul's church Shernborne Norfolk.
HERE




Thornham All Saints left rood screen, church interior photos.

Rood Screen

Rood screens or chancel screens separate the nave and sometimes choir. Carved from wood and can be highly decorative and may feature sets of paintings. Dating from the middle ages and early Renaissance, and In 16th-century England, Henry VIII’s established the Anglican church, it was decreed that the rood and all above the rood beam had to be removed.

Photo: All Saints chuch Thornham North Norfolk.
HERE



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